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dustinweaver:

wellnotwisely:

Domu by Katsuhiro Otomo

uh huh yes yes yes 

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milonogiannis:

inthedarkarcade asked for something from Pluto

milonogiannis:

inthedarkarcade asked for something from Pluto

(via huamachuco)

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nock-nock-nock:

COMME des GARÇONS × OTOMO KATSUHIRO

nock-nock-nock:

COMME des GARÇONS × OTOMO KATSUHIRO

(via swrd-play)

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akatako:

from “The Art of Shintaro Kago JP 2”
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(Source: saktiphoenix, via huamachuco)

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snubpollard:

(Offered, Ryōichi Ikegami, written by Kazuo Koike)

this made the perfect impromptu soundtrack to this sequence

(via huamachuco)

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(via swrd-play)

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duss005:

hiroaki samura is part of the reason i ever wanted to pick up a brush.

duss005:

hiroaki samura is part of the reason i ever wanted to pick up a brush.

(Source: asanorin)

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zegas:

stellarcaprice:

Japanese design is so great

Jiro Kuwata, Batman.

zegas:

stellarcaprice:

Japanese design is so great

Jiro Kuwata, Batman.

(Source: drugraphic)

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(Source: retrosofa, via de-maupin)

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thesaddestbitchinallofspectrum:

Hisashi Eguchi

thesaddestbitchinallofspectrum:

Hisashi Eguchi

(Source: tm31415, via swrd-play)

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danmazur:

See/read more in my post on early shōjo manga at danmazurcomics.com:

"The revolutionary material produced in the 1970s by the “Year 24 Group” — the first major wave of women mangaka – was a culmination of aesthetic and thematic developments of the previous 50 years.  I don’t think the term “genre,” as we generally use it, fits here; for me, shōjo manga, as it has evolved, embodies a broad, complex aesthetic category, one that can accomodate many genres — maybe we can call shōjo a gender of manga (regardless of the biological gender of its creators or readers — see Itō, Kimiō, When a “Male” Reads Shōjo Manga).Shōjo represents an example of the power of a marginalized aesthetic, one of those cases  in popular culture where a form designed to reinforce a power structure (in this case the gender roles of girls and women in Japan), can expose the conflicts and contradictions within that structure and have a destabilizing effect.”

 

(via mercurialblonde)

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fanta-z:

Crying Freeman, Ryoichi Ikegami

fanta-z:

Crying Freeman, Ryoichi Ikegami

(via noliferlauren)

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huamachuco:

woundeddog:

From Inoue Takehiko’s art book Sumi and Water

gah, the blades of grass

(Source: hecse)

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fehyesvintagemanga:

Tezuka Osamu

fehyesvintagemanga:

Tezuka Osamu

(via samhumphries)