Photo
oldbookillustrations:

Keep hold.
Jules Férat, from The fur country, by Jules Verne, Boston, 1874.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Keep hold.

Jules Férat, from The fur country, by Jules Verne, Boston, 1874.

(Source: archive.org)

Photo
1910-again:

Guido Cagnacci, Maddalena Svenuta (Fainting Magdalene) 1663 
Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica, Rome

1910-again:

Guido Cagnacci, Maddalena Svenuta (Fainting Magdalene) 1663 

Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica, Rome

(Source: antiqueart)

Photo
1910-again:

Giacomo Balla, Spirit-Form Transformation 1918

1910-again:

Giacomo Balla, Spirit-Form Transformation 1918

Photo
dantes-infernos:

Knight, Death and the Devil by Albrecht Dürer, 1513–14.
I hold this piece in my living room, but it is sadly stashed away for the time being.

dantes-infernos:

Knight, Death and the Devil by Albrecht Dürer, 1513–14.

I hold this piece in my living room, but it is sadly stashed away for the time being.

(via traditionalcomics)

Photo
halluzinationguillotine:

snowce:

Andrew Wyeth, Riverboat, 1963

i feel this painting on some indescribable level rn

halluzinationguillotine:

snowce:

Andrew Wyeth, Riverboat, 1963

i feel this painting on some indescribable level rn

Photo
unrequited-rage:




Messages to the PublicSpectacolor electronic sign 20 x 40 ft. Text: Truisms, 1977–79 Times Square, New York © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 

unrequited-rage:

Messages to the Public
Spectacolor electronic sign
20 x 40 ft.
Text:
Truisms, 1977–79
Times Square, New York
© Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 

(via gothsummer)

Photo
blackkittenclan:

photograph by  Fernando Osorno Cruz
Photo
magictransistor:

Edward Gooch. Auguste Rodin. 1900. 
Rodin in the garden of his villa at Meudon, near Paris. Behind him is the original plaster statue of ‘The Creation of Man’.

magictransistor:

Edward Gooch. Auguste Rodin. 1900. 

Rodin in the garden of his villa at Meudon, near Paris. Behind him is the original plaster statue of ‘The Creation of Man’.

Photo
carminagf:

The Ramparts of God’s House (detail). 1889.  John Melhuish Strudwick

carminagf:

The Ramparts of God’s House (detail). 1889.  John Melhuish Strudwick

(via venomousswan)

Photo
magictransistor:

Georg Brentel, Magic Circles and Portable Sundials (Engraving); Lauingen, Germany, 1619.

magictransistor:

Georg Brentel, Magic Circles and Portable Sundials (Engraving); Lauingen, Germany, 1619.

Photo
ancientpeoples:

Terracotta ‘Tanagra’ figure of an old nurse
Greek
c.300 BCSaid to be from Tanagra, possibly from Athens, Greece
This stooped old woman with hunched shoulders holds a large, naked baby firmly in her arms. She wears a voluminous, sleeved chiton (tunic) and most of her hair is contained in a sakkos (a bag-like headdress). Her face, with its raised eyebrows, sagging, wrinkled cheeks and chin, and frame of snail-shell curls is distinctly theatrical. The ‘Old Nurse’ was a popular character in Greek comic drama from the late fifth century BC onwards. While earlier terracotta actor figures are clearly characterised by their padded costumes or obvious masks, it can be difficult to decide whether later examples like this represent an actor or the real-life character on which the comic type was based.
It is uncertain where this figure was made, as similar old nurse figures have been found at both Athens and Tanagra. However, the high quality of the modelling and the appearance of the clay suggest that this example may be Athenian.
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Terracotta ‘Tanagra’ figure of an old nurse

Greek

c.300 BC
Said to be from Tanagra, possibly from Athens, Greece

This stooped old woman with hunched shoulders holds a large, naked baby firmly in her arms. She wears a voluminous, sleeved chiton (tunic) and most of her hair is contained in a sakkos (a bag-like headdress). Her face, with its raised eyebrows, sagging, wrinkled cheeks and chin, and frame of snail-shell curls is distinctly theatrical. The ‘Old Nurse’ was a popular character in Greek comic drama from the late fifth century BC onwards. While earlier terracotta actor figures are clearly characterised by their padded costumes or obvious masks, it can be difficult to decide whether later examples like this represent an actor or the real-life character on which the comic type was based.

It is uncertain where this figure was made, as similar old nurse figures have been found at both Athens and Tanagra. However, the high quality of the modelling and the appearance of the clay suggest that this example may be Athenian.

Source: British Museum

Photoset

isqineeha:

Checkpoint Fashion Week (2011-2012)
Palestinian Artist LAILA SHAWA

In this video-loop installation, the artist employs CCTV footage of a Palestinian resistance suicide-bomber taken from a 2007 documentary The Cult of the Suicide Bomber. The footage shows the woman being apprehended by IDF soldiers and asked to take her clothes off in order to reveal the explosives around her that she hesitated/failed to detonate. Laila Shawa claims that this failure was what inspired her to examine this theme:

Her failure intrigued me because I thought if you’re going to be a suicide bomber you’re going to do it properly.

This argument led her to conclude that this failure could be attributed to the possibility that:

whoever gave this to her didn’t care whether she lived or died: she blows herself up, fine. If she doesn’t, she’ll get caught. She’s dispensable. (x)

From this, Shawa sought to tackle this theme from a perspective that situates those women not only in the political and resistance theology that inspires it, but also into a larger social context:

I didn’t want to be judgmental in my work. I wanted to pose the question: are women suicide bombers heroes or are they victims-or are they both? I had to put her in the context of occupation, I had to put her in the context of Gaza being bombed and I had to put her in the context of children being killed. (x)

The video installation shows this fading and manipulated footage, which eventually becomes obscured by bright Arabic verses from the Quran. The project was part of a larger exhibition which included other pieces, such as Birds of Paradise and Inside Paradise that highlighted the brutality and criminality of the Israeli occupier.

I am wary of the very question “are suicide bombers heroes” due to the indiscriminate nature of the act, but I like everything else about this piece. It sits in a strange way. 

(via cousinmosquito)

Tags: art politics
Photo
tierradentro:

Born on this day (07/28/1860): Alphonse Mucha.
“Head of a Girl”, 1900.

tierradentro:

Born on this day (07/28/1860): Alphonse Mucha.

Head of a Girl”, 1900.

Photo
allaboutmary:

An 18th century painting of Our Lady of Mount Carmel by the Bolivian artist Gaspar Miguel de Berrio.

allaboutmary:

An 18th century painting of Our Lady of Mount Carmel by the Bolivian artist Gaspar Miguel de Berrio.

(Source: artandantiquesmag.com, via centuriespast)

Photo
europeansculpture:

Jan Desmarets

europeansculpture:

Jan Desmarets